28% of Indian millennials admit unemployment is their biggest concern

For their global counterparts, the biggest concern is cost of living with 36% admitting so

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Jobs and livelihood remain the topmost concern for most Indians, even millennials. As per the Deloitte Global 2022 Gen Z and Millennial Survey, 28 per cent of Indian millennials are concerned about unemployment. In fact, unemployment is their topmost concern, followed by climate change/protecting the environment (24 per cent), healthcare/disease prevention (19 per cent), sexual harassment (18 per cent)and economic growth (18 per cent).

On the other hand, for global millennials, the biggest concern is cost of living, with 36 per cent admitting it is their topmost concern. This is followed by concern about climate change/protecting the environment, which trouble about 25 per cent of the global millennials, followed by health care/disease prevention(21 per cent). Concern about unemployment (20 per cent) comes fourth, followed by crime/personal safety (18 per cent).

Indian Genzs, are more worried about education, skills, and training and climate change/protecting the environment than unemployment. In fact, 25 per cent of Indian GenZs are most concerned about education, skills, and training, while about 23 per cent are concerned about climate change/protecting the environment than unemployment. Only about 22 per cent are worried about unemployment, followed by 21 per cent who are worried about the mental health of their generation and 21 per cent about sexual harassment.

Compared to Indian GenZs, their global counterparts are most concerned about cost of living. While 29 per cent of global GenZs are most concerned about cost of living, 24 per cent are concerned about climate change/the environment. Concern for unemployment comes in third at 20 per cent, followed by concern about the mental health of their generation at 19 per cent and sexual harassment at 17 per cent.

In 2021, only about nine per cent of Indian GenZs wanted to stay in their company beyond five years, while 75 per cent wanted to leave within two years. In 2022, the figures have improved with 13 per cent GenZs wanting to stay over five years, and 56 per cent wanting to leave in two years.

In 2021, about 29 per cent of Indian millennials wished to continue in their current organisation for more than five years, while in 2022, 39 per cent want to do so.

In 2021, 45% Indian millennials wanted to leave their job within two years, but in 2022 only 26 per cent want to do so.

Among the respondents who would like to quit their jobs within two years, 51 per cent Indian GenZs would like to do so without another job in hand, compared to 43% Indian millennials with the same intent.

About 21 per cent GenZs left their organisations because they thought the remuneration wasn’t high enough. About 18% left because they were not allowed enough flexibility. About 17 per cent admit that the pandemic made them think over their values and aspirations. About 11 per cent experienced burnout, while 10 per cent left because their role offered no work-life balance.

While choosing to work for an organisation, 37 per cent Indian GenZs consider good work-life balance compared to 35 per cent Indian millennials. About 33 per cent Indian GenZs and 33 per cent Indian millennials look at learning and development opportunities available at an organisation, while accepting a job. Growth opportunities and career progress attract 28 per cent of GenZs, compared to 26 per cent millennials. Only about 26 per cent GenZs opt for positive work culture, compared to 33 per cent Indian millennials. About 24 per cent GenZs want to make a positive impact on society compared to 23 per cent Indian millennials.

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