Why do we need cross-functional inputs while making HR policies?

Should the subject matter expert alone be the one making HR policies? Will such policies be aligned with the business?

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Organisations usually have different teams working on various projects that will help them achieve their targets and move closer to the organisational goal. There are many events and campaigns during which the sales and the marketing managers work closely on a regular basis. However, sometimes, cross-functional personnel are made to work together, formally, for better results. For instance, if an organisation is launching a new product line, it will require the engineering, sales and marketing departments to work together on such a project.

Accordingly, the sales personnel can work on the pricing of the product. Let’s suppose that the price is set at Rs 100. The marketing manager can arrange for low channels to promote the product, and subsequently, the engineer can remove some complexity in the design to bring down the price of the product.

In this case, the product was made with some inputs from the sales and marketing team. Then, why should HR systems and policies be made only by the subject matter expert? To ensure alignment with the business you will need to take inputs of personnel from various functions across the organisation. Only then will the whole design be accepted by all and remain aligned to the needs of the business.

Subhro Bhaduri, CHRO, Aditya Birla Capital believes that every function in an organisation contributes to the business and so does HR. “The HR policies are made with the inputs of the employees— through employee surveys— and the leadership teams sit together to discuss the HR policies,” shares Bhaduri. All the line managers in sales and marketing are connected with the HR functions. They all have to manage people in the end and for that you have to take their inputs while making HR policies.

Subhro Bhaduri

“It is not possible to make policies without the inputs from other functions because involving other people makes the policy making and implementation processes much easier”

When the policies are designed, organisations also look at the benchmark in their particular industry. The policies are finally designed according to the trends in the industry and the needs of the organisation. “We look for benchmarks in other companies and then decide upon the policy design. Also, there are certain requests from employees in case of leaves and women’s security. Therefore, we compare it with the market standard and then design policies,” shares Venkataramana B, Group president-HR, Landmark Group.
Venkataramana also reveals that cross-functional inputs are taken during the designing of the HR policies. It helps to bind people together and supports diversity and inclusion. “In our organisation, the policies are run through a senior leadership meeting where inputs from all the functions are encouraged. If this is not done, the policies will only be made from an HR point of view or a CEO point of view,” mentions Venkataramana.

Taking inputs from other functions makes it easy to design policies according to the needs of the organisation. Looking at the needs and requests of the staff through employee surveys also makes it easier for the HR to design staff-friendly policies.

“It is not possible to make policies without the inputs from other functions because involving other people makes the policy making and implementation processes much easier,” says Bhaduri.

Venkataramana B

“Taking inputs from different functions makes the implementation of the policies simpler and easier”

 

Inviting inputs from different functions creates a bonding in the organisation. There can be different dimensions to the policies with inputs from finance, sales and other key functions.

“Taking inputs from different functions makes the implementation of the policies simpler and easier,” says Venkataramana.

When cross-functional teams come together with different views and opinions, something innovative and creative comes out of such collaborations. Similarly, taking inputs from employees belonging to different functions and involving other leaders helps to make innovative and thoughtful policies for the people and the business.

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