“Don’t accept a job offer, if you haven’t met the boss,” say HR experts

Any interview is a two-way process, and it’s important for the candidate to have a chat with the reporting manager to be able to evaluate the latter.

1
4305

During an interview, the accepted protocol is that the interviewer will evaluate the candidate on whether or not he/she fits the bill.

However, the reverse process also happens – the interviewee is also doing the same. He/she is evaluating the future boss.

This is why candidates are advised to meet the reporting manager before accepting a job offer.

Unfortunately, this doesn’t always happen. There are instances when candidates do not even get to meet their immediate reporting managers during an interview. The reasons could be many — they may be out of town or preoccupied with other commitments.

“An interview is after all a conversation between two individuals that allows each to evaluate the other. As a candidate, one can evaluate the person across the table by the nature and quality of questions and the way they respond to questions one may have.”

Hari TN, head – HR, Big Basket

HR leaders, though, term it as a very callous way of recruiting. Especially in lateral hiring if the would-be boss or reporting manager is not present at the interview to assess a potential hire, it is seen as an act of callousness bordering on insensitivity.

Hari TN, head – HR, Big Basket, explains the importance of meeting the reporting boss.

“An interview is after all a conversation between two individuals that allows each to evaluate the other. As a candidate, one can evaluate the person across the table by the nature and quality of questions and the way they respond to questions one may have,” he says.

Ashish Anand, group CHRO, SAR Group also stresses on the importance of meeting the future manager. He strongly believes that during interviews candidates do assess their interviewer and in many cases, they also reject a job offer if they do not get a feeling of comfort from the future manager or the interviewer.

Debjani Roy, chief HR officer, Mind Your Fleet, feels that reporting managers not meeting the candidate is not just a bad practice, but even unjust.

During interviews candidates do assess their interviewer and in many cases, they also reject a job offer if they do not get a feeling of comfort from the future manager or the interviewer.”

Ashish Anand, group CHRO, SAR Group

“A person who couldn’t care enough to spend some time with a person who would be part of every waking hour of that person at work. I don’t think such a person qualifies to be a manager or leader. Such people should not have a team reporting to them in the first place,” Roy asserts.

“People who really care about building a team, will have a genuine interest in the hire, irrespective of the level,” she adds.

Even if the company doesn’t arrange for an interview, the candidate should insist on one.

Yes of course, there are other ways to evaluate the reporting boss.

Hari believes there are several cues that a smart candidate can read to gauge the intellect, operating style, and values of the boss during interviews.

Roy agrees, “Candidates do observe the body language, use of certain words, tone, and whether the interviewer is sensible enough to make one feel comfortable and the kind of questions the person poses.”

“A person who couldn’t care enough to spend some time with a person who would be part of every waking hour of that person at work. I don’t think such a person qualifies to be a manager or leader. Such people should not have a team reporting to them in the first place.”

Debjani Roy, chief HR officer, Mind Your Fleet

Roy is quick to add that 30-45 minutes is too short a time to judge a person – be it the interviewer or interviewee. However, she is also of the opinion that intelligent candidates usually come well prepared and they are greater observers and are able to gauge and sometimes even lead the interview in the right direction.

Some HR experts also suggest that it’s important to research not just about the company, but also the interviewer. It’s important to be informed about the would-be manager’s career progression, thoughts, beliefs and leadership qualities, and all of these information is available in professional social media websites.

Next candidates shouldn’t be hesitant to ask questions of their would-be bosses, it is time to discard that hesitance. To be curious about a person one is about to report to, is not a sin at all!

1 COMMENT

Comment on the Article

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

fourteen + 10 =