Fujitsu embraces AI to improve work–life balance

Creating a culture of its own, Fujitsu is disrupting the paradigm in more ways than one by introducing AI while preserving human interaction.

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Fujitsu Consulting India (Fujitsu) is fading the culture divide between India and Japan and how! Interestingly, all its employees readily embrace Japanese culture and have no qualms in learning the language either.

Japanese culture

Planning meticulously, following methodologies, Kaizen, and survival theory are some aspects of Japanese culture that provide a solid foundation to Fijitsu India. And why not? Japan was, and arguably still is, one of Asia’s primary superpowers.

Every employee that walks into the Fujitsu office gets an opportunity to learn not only from Japanese culture, but also other world cultures because the Company largely serves international clients.

In the context of Japanese influence, CHRO Sumit Sabharwal says, “They have operated on the whole survival theory (earthquakes and storms), and have worked very responsibly with nature, and a similar attitude is also seen in business.”

“What is really interesting is how we marry the right hand to the left and we do that very often. We are hiring from TCS, Infosys, Tech Mahindra, and so on. Since there are very few Japanese companies around, not many have experienced their culture. But we make the entire process of settling down very simple for them,” adds Sabharwal

So that’s how the culture is—a relaxed workplace yet one that fosters the habit of being organised and methodical.

Yokoso

In its eagerness to provide a great candidate experience to potential employees, Fujitsu has created a gamified tool. True to its meaning, Yokoso, which means ‘welcome’ in Japanese, ensures that new joinees feel like they are a part of the Fujitsu family from the minute they receive the offer letter.

Redesigning the onboarding experience has helped them raise the ratio of offer to joining from 65 per cent to 85 per cent. Apparently, Yokoso gives a sneak peek into the life at Fujitsu. This gamified tool starts with a message from the HR head and at every stage there are certain exciting quizzes and levels to reach.

“We wanted to create something that would help engage the loved ones of a candidate on getting an offer letter. These are milestone occasions and Yokoso simply helps to establish a quick connection between the brand and the user, narrates Sabharwal.

Sumit Sabharwal

“What is really interesting is how we marry the right hand to the left and we do that very often. We are hiring from TCS, Infosys, Tech Mahindra, and so on. Since there are very few Japanese companies around, not many have experienced their culture. But we make the entire process of settling down very simple for them”

Dress code

Fujitsu has altogether disrupted its culture around the dress code. Apparently, it is very common for the employees to dress up casually on all days of the week, and that too, including torn jeans and cool shorts. Being a strong supporter of individuality and diversity, the organisation wants to give its people more freedom and ease of work.

Employee Resource Group

The employees often come together to discuss common topics of interest. Currently three groups have mushroomed amongst the employees to help one another on parenting, pets and handling aged parents— all interesting subjects, no doubt.

This is precisely what the CHRO of Fujitsu had in mind when he initiated the countrywide Employee Resource Groups (EAG).

“How can we get our employees together to start conversations and share their stories without the involvement of the HR and the management? This was the thought behind EAG,” says Sabharwal.

Amber

Using AI, Fujitsu has successfully created a virtual friend for the employees, by the name of Amber. Incidentally, Amber appears on the computer screen of the employees every, 15-30-90-180-360 days, to gather their responses in terms of their feelings, based on various parameters.

Sabharwal says, “It’s a mood-o-meter for me— a consolidated report in the form of data and graphs— which gives me a clear picture of what my 5000 employees are feeling. Not only does this bring to surface a few cases where counselling is needed but also helps us to share some outstanding stories and experiences of others.”

Radical in his thinking, Sabharwal does not like to run HR as just another function to serve the employees. He believes in developing a relationship with the staff to help them be productive and happy at the same time. His mantra is to play with technology without hindering the human interaction.

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