74% HR professionals select learning partners based on comprehensiveness of course

Only 18% of respondents of the Upskilling and Reskilling for Future Jobs report by HRKatha and Hero Vired thought certification was a top priority while choosing a learning partner for their employee learning programmes

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Picking a good book requires some effort. From the content quality to the look and feel, we examine everything before paying for it. Organisations have to be as careful while choosing learning partners for their employee learning programmes. It is not as easy as it may appear to be. After all, there is no dearth of competition and each learning provider will claim to be the best.

The Upskilling and Reskilling for Future Jobs report by HRKatha and Hero Vired points out the deciding factors that influence the choice of learning partner.

Course content: An overwhelming 74 per cent of the respondents felt that comprehensiveness of the course was top priority while selecting a learning partner. About 24 per cent thought comprehensiveness was important, while 80 per cent of the senior managers and 76 per cent of the CXOs believed comprehensiveness of the content was the most important selection criterion. Only 62 per cent of the mid-management professionals believed that learning partners should be selected basis the comprehensiveness of the course they offered.

In the IT & ITES sector, however, 90 per cent of the respondents felt comprehensiveness of the course was the most important deciding factor, followed by the BFSI space where 88 per cent felt the same and the hospitality sector, where 83 per cent agreed. The retail and logistics sectors did not think it was top priority.

Brand name: A significant 50 per cent of senior managers who were part of the survey, felt that they would consider the legacy and brand value of the learning partner. Only 46 per cent of CXOs and middle-level managers said the legacy and brand value of the learning partner will influence their decision.

For more insights, download the full study

Mode of training: Forty three per cent of the respondents said that the fact that the training was in-person or instructor-led was a factor that helped to decide on the learning partner. Another 44 per cent did admit that this factor was important in the decision making but not a top priority. A good 51 per cent of middle managers preferred in-person or instructor-led training and gave it top priority, while only 46 per cent of the CXOs thought it was a top priority.

Certification: Interestingly, only 18 per cent of respondents thought certification was a top priority and 14 per cent said it was not at all important! Most of the respondents, over 60 per cent, felt it was important but not a priority. Around 27 per cent of the respondents from the IT sector thought it was top priority. Certification was more prominent for mid-management professionals, as 78 per cent voted in favour of it.

As many as 119 HR professionals participated in this survey, of which 53 per cent were senior managers and function heads, while 36 per cent held mid-management roles and around 11 per cent were CXOs.

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